bevans branham email blog palm springs caA recent article with Entrepreneur.com explored the idea of going an entire year without using email. According to the story, Claire Burge, the owner of Get Organized, wanted to free herself from the burden and anxiety of responding to, and writing daily emails.

As most of us know, email has worked wonders in making our daily work lives easier and more manageable. Email is a brilliant tool that has helped organize our lives for years now, however, data is beginning to support the idea that email can get in the way of our productivity. It makes sense, too. If you consider how often we are checking emails on an hourly basis, you begin to realize how this time adds up. More importantly you begin to realize how you can better spend that time.

There are reports which show that email can even be bad for our health. According to these reports, it causes increased levels of stress and anxiety. Loughborough University conducted a study in 2013 to analyze the effect of email activity on blood pressure, heart rate and stress. They found that 83% of government employees did in fact experience higher levels of stress, blood pressure, and heart rate.

We now find ourselves dancing a fine line between maximizing organization and acting in the best interest of our health. As mentioned above, Get Organized owner Claire Burge was motivated to eliminate this unwanted stress and ultimately decided to rid herself of email for an entire year. According to Burge, email is a waste of time. As a result of being email free, Burge found herself to be more productive and could dedicate more time to propelling her business to the next level.

The Entrepreneur article provides a more in depth of analysis of Claire Burge’s year without email. The idea does beg the question, do we really need email? Can I really do more without email? There is no doubt that it helps organize our lives, both personally and professionally, but the thought of action and doing far outweighs the process of mindlessly checking emails. Perhaps this is an exercise we should all put into practice to some extent.